Eventify

iPhone mockup of Communicaid.

Timeline: Feb - Mar 2015

Project Type: Class Project

My Role: Project Lead, UI Designer

Tools: Sketch, Proto.io

Skills: Problem Space Research, Wireframing, Mobile UI Design

Context

My humble beginnings as a designer

In my Intro to Informatics class, my group and I had 6 weeks to conceptualize, design, and prototype any application idea of our choosing. This was my very first design/tech class and it only covered a few parts of the whole design process. Fortunately, I now have a much more indepth understanding of the UCD process.

Problem Space

As we were brainstorming problem spaces, we found two that really intrigued us:

The first was the lack event discovery options for students like us. The current hub for event discovery was Facebook Events but that was limited because you had to either stumble upon the event or be invited to know it was even happening.

The second problem we found was that small local organizations (such as Seattle Relay for Life or a UW club) didn't have the proper resources and bandwidth to compete with large scale organizations (such as the Seahawks) in the online event marketing space.

Solution Proposal

Killing two birds with one stone

After realizing these two pain points, we saw that there was a natural intersection between the two: local event discovery/marketing. We decided to go with a map based application for discovering events nearby that were being hosted by local organizations. This way, students can easily find new events around them. For local businesses, we make sure to restrict the allowed events to prevent large name organizations (such as Cirque du Soleil) from getting onto our platform.

Final Screens

Screens on screens on screens

Once the solution was refined, I started creating high fidelity mockups of the application. We used these screens to create an interactive prototype in Proto.io which we presented at the end of the quarter. (Unfortunately, my Proto.io trial expored so I can't showcase the prototype. Maybe I'll remake it in InVision one day!)

One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.
One of the screens from the final version of our mobile app prototype.

What I Learned From This Project

Looking back at this project, it was an incredible learning experience for me, as someone jumping into design for the first time. Here are some of the things I learned and some of the skills I developed:

  • Developed 70% of my current Sketch knowledge.
  • Developed 10% of my current design sense.
  • A well thought out design takes time. And time was not on our side for this project. We lacked massive components such as user research, testing, and iterating.
  • Collaborative wireframing is hard. I wish I knew about Figma back then! But even then, it's hard to convey a unified design style among many different people. Because of this, I ended up doing most of the design work.

What I'd Do Differently

There were a lot of holes in this project but given the fact that I only had about 6 weeks to work on it while juggling other classes and extra curricular activites, it makes sense why we skipped over so many details.

  • Conduct stronger user research. I would have interviewed leaders of local organizations to see what their current online event marketing strategies are, where the short comings are in the process, and whether they are actually competing with large organizations or not.
  • I would have tried to figure out a way to differentiate from Meetup.
  • The concept was to give a unique color to each event type (Music, Volunteering/Charity, etc) but looking back I would either change the colors to clash less or have just gone with a two color system. Additionally, the base color green should have only been used as a highlight color. Using it in the top nav drew too much attention to that area.
  • I would have tried to move as many of the top navigation buttons down to the bottom of the screen to increase the ease of reaching those buttons. A mapping of mobile screen thumb zones

    This diagram shows the Thumb Zone heat map from an article by Scott Hurff.

Overall, I'm really proud of my first introduction to design. While this project has it's many short-comings, it's nice to look back and see how I've improved as a designer.

Thanks for scrolling!